Meet Wildlife Sculptor Cathryn Jenkins

By on June 8, 2015
1 Power Play

By Doreen Jung, Arts Editor. Growing up in the Selkirk Mountains, sculptor Cathryn Jenkins was immersed in BC’s wilderness where she developed a love of wildlife. She has always been fascinated by the range of form and movement in animals. Jenkins describes her work as representational; capturing the essence of an animal and the power of wildlife. She focuses on impressions such as the sleekness of an otter, the ripple in a cougar’s stride, and the lumbering of a bear in motion.

Pictured at right: Power Play

Jenkins began sculpting at the age of 14 and by the time she was 20, she was working full-time as a wildlife sculptor. She started working in serpentine stone which has a hardness that is between jade and soapstone. Jenkins was drawn to it because it has a burlap quality that suits the rugged character of her bear sculptures, such as “Power Play”.

Room With A View

Room With A View

Serpentine stone was made available by her mother, Fran Jenkins who was an avid prospector and was able to quarry the stone. Fran Jenkins was also an accomplished sculptor and it was in her studio that her daughter, Cathryn Jenkins developed her love for the art of sculpture.

Mosaic sculptures are also part of Cathryn Jenkins’ work. “A Room with a View” is an eagle mosaic created using serpentine stone with fibreglass and bronze filings as the medium between the pieces of stone. Each of her projects allow Jenkins to follow her passion. “I love the work when it comes to life,” says Jenkins. “When it forms into something I really like, it pulls me along. It feels like the sculpting has caught me and it takes me where it is going.”
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Heading Down To The River

Heading Down To The River

Sculpting has taken a new direction for Jenkins in the last few years. She began to work in clay and bronze after recognizing the beauty of bronze. Taking a patina course from Patrick Kipper in Loveland, Colorado, she was inspired to move into this new medium to express herself. “The excitement of moving in a new direction has brought up all sorts of fun ideas,” commented Jenkins. She is now enjoying creating her sculptures in clay and then casting them in bronze. Putting the finishing touches on “Heading Down to the River” will mean that it will soon be cast in bronze. The work progresses more quickly in clay than in stone and with delight, Jenkins is finding that, “It is really fun to be able to work so quickly.” While working in clay and bronze, Jenkins’ work continues to reflect her dedication to sculpture and her passion for wildlife.
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Alberta Bear

Alberta Bear

Jenkins has exhibited her work at many galleries, museums and other venues throughout the USA and Canada. Her sculptures are part of corporate and private collections.

Currently, Jenkins is completing a commission for the University of Alberta’s new Physical Education and Wellness Centre. “Alberta Bear” is being cast in bronze and will be unveiled at the new PAW Centre in January 2015.

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On The Move-Cast in Bronze

On The Move-Cast in Bronze

Jenkins particpated in The 18th Annual Eastside Culture Crawl in Vancouver. This four day visual arts, design, and crafts festival took place from Nov. 20-23, 2015.
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For more information, visit www.culturecrawl.ca
To learn more about Cathyrn Jenkins and Fran Jenkins, go to http://www.jenkinssculptor.com/.

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